March 2016 Archives

Hirsch Small Batch Reserve Straight Bourbon

| 0 Comments
hirsch-small-batch-reserve-kentucky-straight-bourbon-whiskey-1.jpg
A couple of weeks back an American friend visiting from Detroit came into town with a bottle of Hirsch Small Batch Reserve Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey for us to try. It's not available in the LCBO and has never been listed, so naturally I was curious. The label puzzled me further as it offered up a rather convoluted pedigree of the whisky which was "inspired by the quality of A.H. Hirsch" and distilled in Indiana before being bottled in Silverton, Ohio for San Francisco-based Anchor Distilling Co.

"Huh? But it says Kentucky? Whose whisky am I drinking anyway?"

Turns out that Anchor Distilling (a non-distilling producer) acquired the Hirsch brand in 2011 as part of their pivot into the spirits market. Partnering with Berry Bros. & Rudd, England's oldest wine and spirits merchant, the new owners at Anchor Distilling expanded into the thriving global premium spirits market and Hirsch was to be part of their "super premium" line. In their own words, the new A.H. Hirsch whisky brand is, "an inspired reflection of the legendary A.H. Hirsch Reserve 16 Year Old that many consider to be the finest expression of American bourbon ever produced." If you've never tried this fabled release, you're likely not going to get the chance to do so. The last of this whisky was sold in 2009 and although you may find a few floating around online; expect to pay top dollar.
 
Bottled at 46% ABV, this version of Hirsch comes from an unknown distillery and is a blend of bourbons ranging from seven to nine years old. A little digging reveals some evidence that points to Midwest Grain Products (MGP), formerly known as Lawrenceburg Distillers Indiana (LDI), a massive industrial distilling operation on the Indiana side of the Ohio River as the source of the distillate. While Anchor is keeping the producer a secret, they're remarkably upfront about the composition of the mash bills of their spirit. Using rye grain sourced from Northern Europe and corn from Indiana and Ohio, the producer makes two different spirits with differing levels of rye grain which are then married for an unspecified time to make a final product with a rye content around 26%. 

Feeds



Recent Comments

  • Ryan commented on Legacy Lost: The Macallan 1824 Series:

    It's a damn shame that they decided Canada wasn't worthy of the original age-statement line. I looked high and low for bottles of The Macallan Cask Strength (one of their best ever IMO) and the 12 yr expressions and was able to find a couple in the USA a few years back. I bought a bottle of The Macallan 12 yr when I was in Sweden last fall and I was reminded just how delicious this whisky is compared to the Legacy line.
    You're right, it's worth hoarding!

  • Ryan commented on Talisker 10 years old:

    John, I can't say that I'd recommend a dip in the North Atlantic but I admire your courage! :) Thanks for the feedback.

  • John commented on Talisker 10 years old:

    Thank you for a great review! I enjoy comparing Talisker's lighter peatiness to Lagavulin 16.

    I appreciate your "brine" and "salty" descriptions. I visited the distillery last summer and took a cold plunge into the water off of a beach on the Isle of Skye. The cold, salty waves slapping my face and lips were like Talisker splashing on my tongue!

Whisky Wheel

OpenID accepted here Learn more about OpenID